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TOP 10 BLOGS OF 2016


Ring in the New Year with implementation tips from our Eureka teacher-writers. Get a sense of the most popular Eureka Math topics this year from this list of our top 10 most-viewed blogs.

10. “EUREKA MATH LESSON STRUCTURES”

by Catriona Anderson & Beau Bailey

Explore the differences between the elementary lesson structure and the secondary lesson structures. When preparing your lessons it’s helpful to understand the differences in order to capitalize on the design.

9. “SOLVING WORD PROBLEMS USING TAPE DIAGRAMS” (PART I, PART II)

by Debby Grawn

Examine multiple ways the tape diagram model can be as a problem solving tool throughout various grade levels.

8. “PROBLEM SETS: TIME FRAME NOT TASK FRAME”

by Shelley Petre

Problem Sets are intentionally set within a time frame, not a task frame. Petre walks through the proper approach to the Problem Set and how they are a chance for students to have independent practice, not demonstrate mastery.

7. “COMPARISON OF FRACTIONS: BEYOND COMMON DENOMINATORS”

by Mary Swanson

Given two fractions, how do we compare them? Consider this strategy introduced to Eureka Math students in grade 4.

6. “PACING & PREPARATION”

by Pia Mohsen

A frequent concern voiced by teachers is the pacing of instruction — our Pacing and Preparation Guides are intended to provide an efficient and systematic plan of attack for implementation. Here’s a step-by-step explanation of how to use them.

5. “I’VE GOT THE DATA NOW WHAT DO I DO WITH IT?”

by Colleen Sheeron, Lisa Watts-Lawton, and Robin Ramos

By analyzing student work, you identify common misconceptions and learning gaps. This blog provides tips for how to use the Exit Tickets as a tool for formative assessment and immediate feedback.

4. “IT’S NOT A SCRIPT!”

by MaryJo Wieland

There is a general misunderstanding that Eureka Math lessons are meant to be read as a script. Rather, the writers of the curriculum deliberately designed lessons in the style of vignettes that illustrate exemplars of instructional situations.

3. “RESISTING THE URGE TO RE-TEACH FOR MASTERY”

by MaryJo Wieland

Don’t stop to reteach for mastery — trust the learning process and follow these steps to analyze and customize instruction for your students.

2. “READ, DRAW, WRITE: A BETTER STRATEGY FOR PROBLEM-SOLVING”

by Debby Grawn

What is so great about the RDW approach? Walk through the development of this strategy and see how it benefits students as a problem-solving approach.

1. “PROBLEM-SOLVING THE RDW WAY”

by Lisa Watts-Lawton

Examine student work for insight into how the “Read, Draw, Write” (RDW) problem-solving approach works.

Check out more implementation advice from the Eureka teacher-writers on the Eureka Math blog.

© Great Minds 2016